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Sunday October 26th 2014

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For brain hemorrhage, risk of death is lower at high-volume hospitals

For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of subarachnoid hemorrhage cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Ebola’s evolutionary roots are more ancient than previously thought, study finds

A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola’s family history. The research shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Prognostic factors identified for peripheral squamous cell carcinomas of the lung

A better survival outcome is associated with low blood levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, or absence of tumor invasion either into the space between the lungs and chest wall or into blood vessels of individuals with a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

APIC Ebola readiness survey findings

Only 6 percent of US hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at US hospitals conducted Oct. 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Climate change caused by ocean, not just atmosphere, new Rutgers study finds

Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere. Read about a Rutgers study published in Science that reveals another equally important factor in regulating the earth’s climate.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Cat dentals fill you with dread?

A survey published this year found that over 50 percent of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don’t always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many vets dread feline dental procedures.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan

NASA scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn’s moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth’s poles.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Receiving gossip about others promotes self-reflection and growth

Why are individuals interested in hearing gossip about others’ achievements and failures? Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands studied the effect positive and negative gossip has on how the recipient evaluates him or herself. The study is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Some like it loud

Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Li-ion batteries contain toxic halogens, but environmentally friendly alternatives exist

Physics researchers at VCU have discovered that most of the electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries — commonly found in consumer electronic devices — are superhalogens, and that the vast majority of these electrolytes contain toxic halogens.

Posted on 24 October 2014 | 4:00 am

Science News Headlines – Yahoo News

Get the latest Science news headlines from Yahoo News. Find breaking Science news, including analysis and opinion on top Science stories.

Huge Solar Flare Erupts from Biggest Sunspot in 24 Years (Photos)

Huge Solar Flare Erupts from Biggest Sunspot in 24 Years (Photos)The solar flare occurred Friday afternoon, reaching its peak at 5:41 p.m. EDT (2141 GMT), and triggered a strong radio blackout at the time, according to the U.S. NASA's sun-watching Solar Dynamics Observatory captured stunning video of the huge solar flare. The flare erupted from a giant active sunspot known as AR 12192 and was classified as an X3.1-class solar storm — one of the most powerful types of solar storms on the sun — but it is not the first time the sunspot has made its presence known. "This is the fourth substantial flare from this active region since Oct. 19," NASA spokesperson Karen Fox wrote in a status update. 

Posted on 26 October 2014 | 2:51 am

Google executive sets new stratosphere skydive world record

Handout of still image taken from video shows Google's vice president Alan Eustace returning to earth after a record-breaking skydive over New Mexico(Reuters) – A skydiving Google executive is safely back on Earth after jumping out of a giant balloon floating in the stratosphere more than 25 miles (40 km) above New Mexico, a feat that broke the sound barrier and shattered a world altitude record. Alan Eustace, a senior vice president at the Mountain View, California-based company, was lifted up 135,890 feet (41,419 meters) by an enormous balloon shortly before dawn on Friday, the Paragon Space Development Corp said. …

Posted on 25 October 2014 | 10:05 pm

Splashdown! SpaceX’s Dragon Cargo Spaceship Returns to Earth

Splashdown! SpaceX's Dragon Cargo Spaceship Returns to EarthA private SpaceX Dragon capsule dropped into the Pacific Ocean today (Oct. 25), returning almost 2 tons of cargo and science experiments to Earth from the International Space Station. The unmanned Dragon was released from the space station at 9:57 a.m. EDT (1357 GMT). Its parachute-guided splashdown west of Baja California, which was confirmed around 3:38 p.m. EDT (1938 GMT), marked an end to SpaceX's fourth of 12 unmanned delivery missions to the space station for NASA under a $1.6 billion contract. Dragon had been attached to the orbiting lab for a little more than month.

Posted on 25 October 2014 | 10:00 pm

SpaceX Dragon capsule splashes down in Pacific Ocean

With the Earth in the background the SpaceX Dragon commercial cargo craft is seen as it is grappled by the International Space Station's Canadarm2.(Reuters) – A Space Exploration Technologies Dragon cargo ship ended a monthlong stay at the International Space Station on Saturday and splashed down on schedule in the Pacific Ocean near Mexico. Reid Wiseman and Barry Wilmore, astronauts with U.S. space agency NASA, used the station’s robotic crane to release the capsule, built and operated by California-based SpaceX, as the company is known, at 9:57 a.m. EDT (1357 GMT) as the two vehicles soared 260 miles (418 km) over the northwest coast of Australia. “Dragon is free,” mission commentator Rob Navias said during a live broadcast on NASA TV. …

Posted on 25 October 2014 | 8:57 pm

No Proof That ‘Brain Training’ Games Work, Some Experts Say

Sixty-nine scientists from around the world issued a statement this week, saying that there’s no compelling scientific evidence supporting the claims that playing brain games may actually help people enhance their mental powers or overcome the effects of aging on the brain. The scientists didn’t indicate which brain-training products are making misleading claims and which aren’t. California-based Happy Neuron has nearly 11 million users and offers brain training programs to stimulate the main five cognitive functions, including memory, attention, language, and logical thinking. Rosetta Stone’s Fit Brains offers games, designed by neuroscientists to help train crucial brain skills, the company says.

Posted on 25 October 2014 | 4:49 pm

This Family Doesn’t Sweat: Here’s Why

People with a rare disorder called anhidrosis cannot produce sweat, and now a new study finds that the condition may be caused by a mutation in a single gene. Researchers studied a Pakistani family with several children who could not sweat. The researchers’ analysis of the family members’ genomes revealed that a genetic mutation may have caused the condition in this family. The mutation was in a gene, called ITPR2, that controls a basic cellular process in sweat glands, according to the researchers, led by Katsuhiko Mikoshiba, a molecular cell biologist at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, and Niklas Dahl, a genetics researcher at Uppsala University in Sweden.

Posted on 25 October 2014 | 4:47 pm

Man Recovers From Ebola in Germany After Routine Intensive Care

Man Recovers From Ebola in Germany After Routine Intensive CareOne man who contracted Ebola and even had further complications of the infection has now recovered after receiving routine intensive care at a hospital in Germany. The man's case suggests that even if patients do not have access to experimental Ebola drugs, health care workers can still help them recover from the disease, the doctors who treated him wrote in their report of the case. When it comes to treating Ebola patients, "It's supportive care, supportive care, supportive care," Schaffner told Live Science.

Posted on 25 October 2014 | 12:01 am

Easter Island’s ancient inhabitants weren’t so lonely after all

20070422-AMX-TRAVEL_WLT-EASTERISLAND_1_MBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) – They lived on a remote dot of land in the middle of the Pacific, 2,300 miles (3,700 km) west of South America and 1,100 miles (1,770 km) from the closest island, erecting huge stone figures that still stare enigmatically from the hillsides. But the ancient Polynesian people who populated Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, were not as isolated as long believed. …

Posted on 23 October 2014 | 6:31 pm

Old, cold and bold: Ice Age people dwelled high in Peru’s Andes

Cunchaicha rock shelter in Peruvian AndesBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) – In a bleak, treeless landscape high in the southern Peruvian Andes, bands of intrepid Ice Age people hunkered down in rudimentary dwellings and withstood frigid weather, thin air and other hardships. Scientists on Thursday described the world's highest known Ice Age settlements, two archaeological sites about 2.8 miles (4.5 km) above sea level and about 12,000 years old packed with artifacts including a rock shelter, stone tools, animal bones, food remnants and primitive artwork. …

Posted on 23 October 2014 | 6:02 pm

Swiss scientists determine comet’s ‘perfume’

Rotten eggs, horse urine, formaldehyde, bitter almonds, alcohol, vinegar and a hint of sweet ether.

Posted on 23 October 2014 | 4:04 pm